Accused shoplifter says she needed Christmas gifts for family - FOX 8 WVUE New Orleans News, Weather, Sports, Social

Accused shoplifter says she needed Christmas gifts for family

Sharon Clark, 55 Sharon Clark, 55

Houma, La. - A 55-year-old Houma woman says she stole hundreds of dollars of merchandise from Wal-Mart because she has lots of relatives and "there ain't no Santa Claus". Sharon Lee Clark was allegedly observed shoplifting from the store on Grand Caillou Road on December 30th.

When Houma police officers arrived on the scene, they encountered Clark attempting to leave the store with more than $750 worth of cosmetic items. 

During questioning, Clark reportedly admitted to stealing the items for Christmas gifts for her relatives and when asked why would she steal 70 items to give as Christmas gifts after the holiday season she responded "she has a lot of relatives back home in Florida and there ain't no Santa Claus".

Clark was arrested for theft (over $500) and the merchandise was returned to Wal-mart. She was transported to the Terrebonne Parish Jail where she was incarcerated awaiting trial or bond.

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