Pair of Japanese melons fetch $15,730 at auction - FOX 8 WVUE New Orleans News, Weather, Sports, Social

Pair of Japanese melons fetch $15,730 at auction

Nothing brings happiness like a perfect pair of $15,730 melons. Mind out of the gutter. We're talking about two prized cantaloupes.

According to Fox News.com, two Yubari melons sold at auction in Japan on Friday for $15,730 (1.6 million yen). It marked one of the highest prices ever paid for the fruit, more than doubling the $6,000 a Japanese man paid for a 17-pound Densuke watermelon back in 2008. Although, the price was lower than the record $23,500 bid for a pair of Yubari cantaloupes also in 2008.

The 8.1 pound melons were auctioned at a high-end fruit sale in the Sapporo Central Wholesale Market in northern Hokkaido. The auction took place on the first day of the season for the coveted cantaloupe.

In a fruit-scarce country where a pack of 20 cherries retails for $100, the hybrid breed of Yubari melon is considered a status symbol, much like a fine wine or scotch. The buyers often purchase the fruits to present to colleagues as gifts.

So next time you stab into a juicy melon, think twice. You may be destroying the produce equivalent of a 1787 Chateau Lafite Bordeaux. 



  • Trending StoriesTrending StoriesMore>>

  • Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Tuesday, May 23 2017 7:26 PM EDT2017-05-23 23:26:19 GMT

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    more>>

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    more>>
Powered by Frankly