Memorial for fallen officers is more poignant for some - FOX 8 WVUE New Orleans News, Weather, Sports, Social

Memorial for fallen officers is more poignant for some

Ten Louisiana law officers have died in the line of duty over the past year. (FOX 8 Photo) Ten Louisiana law officers have died in the line of duty over the past year. (FOX 8 Photo)
NEW ORLEANS, LA (WVUE) -

A New Orleans police officer injured in the line of duty last week is back on the job and doing fine.

Officer Kenny Gill was among dozens of people attending a memorial for fallen officers in Mid City on Monday in a ceremony more poignant for some than for others. They gathered to remember fallen officers in a state that's had more than most.

"We thank you God for every officer that's on the street," said Rev. Antoine Barrier with Household of Faith church.

Ten Louisiana law officers have died in the line of duty over the past year, making this state second in the nation, but the memorial hits closer to home for some.

"Thanks God he's okay," said NOPD Superintendent Michael Harrison.

Officer Gill, who was shot at just three days ago responding to a murder in Gentilly, is back on the job.

"He ran toward the danger and was fired upon,” Harrison said. [He took] shrapnel to the shoulder."

Also in attendance was Officer Darrell Doucette, who was shot at 20 years ago.

"The doctor said ‘it's a miracle you're here,’" Doucette said.

In May of 1995, Doucette and officer Errol Sidney were shot in the Desire-Florida area.

"I was hit here, went out of my armpit, down my side, and down my back," Doucette said.

"He's another example of what courage really looks like," Harrison said.

Doucette's attacker, Antoine Carroll, is now serving two life sentences.

Officer Doucette remained off duty for six months, rehabbing and questioning whether he would ever go back to police work.

"It's never easy doing this job, and when we encounter people trying to kill us while we help our community - it's a feeling you can't describe," he said.

Doucette said he found his way back, by going to the mall, of all places, to see if he could handle being around people again.

"I was approached by someone by my nickname," said Doucette.

It was a drug dealer that Doucette had helped to arrest and convict – and he had a word of thanks.

"He said he's been out for six months and has a job. When that happened, I was ready to go back to work," Doucette said.

He's now been back for 20 years, more aware than ever.

"When I put the badge on, I put it on knowing someone else might take it off," Doucette said.

It's a chance he's willing to take for a job and a city that he loves.

Doucette, who now wears a bulletproof vest, was not wearing one at the time of the shooting. Twenty years ago, the department had very few.

As for Officer Errol Sidney, he's no longer with the force but is doing fine.

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