LSU study shows La. residents willing to pay more for certain pr - FOX 8 WVUE New Orleans News, Weather, Sports, Social

LSU study shows La. residents willing to pay more for certain programs

Louisiana State Capitol (Source: WAFB) Louisiana State Capitol (Source: WAFB)
BATON ROUGE, LA (WAFB) -

An LSU study shows that Louisiana residents are willing to pay a little more, especially in order to help fund programs they support.

Those programs include higher education, which is facing millions of dollars in cuts because lawmakers did not fully fix the budget. 

According to the 2016 Louisiana Study, 50 percent of Louisiana residents want to see more higher education spending and were willing to pay more in taxes to do so, while 33 percent want to see spending stay the same. There was 5 percent who wanted to see spending cuts instead. 

Another big topic with residents was roads, bridges and highways. The study shows that 46 percent of residents are willing to pay more tax to see spending go up, 23 percent want to keep spending the same and 5 percent wanted funding to be reduced. 

One area that did not fit the pattern was welfare and food stamps. Only 12 percent were willing to pay more in taxes to see spending go up, while 43 percent wanted to see spending cut. 

Overall, the author of this study said there is a lesson for lawmakers having to increase taxes. 

"Make the connections between revenue and what it is used for, and people are generally able to accept those revenue increases if they are going to programs they value," said Dr. Michael Henderson with LSU's Public Policy Research Lab. 

There was another interesting fact from the study. Over the past decade, the number of people saying the sales tax and income tax are too high has dropped significantly to the lowest figure since they started doing this research 12 years ago. 

Copyright 2016 WAFB. All rights reserved.

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