Governor of Mississippi urged to veto controversial bill - FOX 8 WVUE New Orleans News, Weather, Sports, Social

Governor of Mississippi urged to veto controversial bill

Anti-Defamation League urges Mississippi governor to veto controversial bill Anti-Defamation League urges Mississippi governor to veto controversial bill
JACKSON, MS (WVUE) -

The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) released a statement today calling for Governor Phil Bryant to veto House Bill 1523, Mississippi's "Protecting Freedom of Conscience from Government Discrimination Act" ("HB 1523"). 
 
Leaders of the ADL say they support religious liberty, and that while HB 1523 alleges to be a religious freedom law, in reality the law could become a vehicle for protecting those who want to discriminate against the LGBT community. ADL also informed Governor Bryant that HB 1523 would allow not only businesses to deny service and employment to the LGBT community based on religious belief but would also permit government employees to abdicate their duties to serve the public by valuing their individual beliefs more than the necessary and required job duties of their positions.
  
Allison Padilla-Goodman, ADL's South Central Regional Director, issued the following statement:
               
"ADL is a staunch advocate for religious freedom, but we urge Governor Bryant to veto this disgraceful and discriminatory bill.  Religious liberty protections are a shield for the free exercise of religion and not a sword to harm others. In the United States, the government does not sanction or support discrimination. If HB 1523 is not vetoed, it will turn back the clock 50 years on civil rights in Mississippi.  It is critical to remember that during the civil rights movement the very same religious exemption arguments were made in support of discrimination against the African American community.  Just as those arguments were rejected, HB 757 must be rejected.  Standing alongside equality, fairness and being on the right side of history are reason enough to veto this legislation."

Governor Bryant and most members of the Mississippi state senate say they do not believe the bill is discriminatory. A final version of the bill is expected to pass the Mississippi House sometime in early April.

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