LSU Health doctor talks about 'new' Zika complication in adults - FOX 8 WVUE New Orleans News, Weather, Sports, Social

LSU Health doctor talks about 'new' Zika complication in adults

Dr. John England, M.D., Chair of Neurology at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine (Source: FOX 8) Dr. John England, M.D., Chair of Neurology at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine (Source: FOX 8)
NEW ORLEANS (WVUE) -

Beautiful weather attracts boaters to Lake Pontchartrain, and those who just like peering at the water from a boat launch.

Dealing with mosquitoes comes with the territory.

"You get bit all the time,” said Stan Alexis, who frequents the lake area near the Ted Hickey Bridge.

The state health department says there are 11 confirmed Zika cases in New Orleans and all are travel related, another four in Jefferson and one in St. Tammany.

“Yeah, very alarmed because I just heard that,” said Alexis.

"It is a concern down here because we do be by the water, we do go out to the bayous and fish, so it's a possibility so we have to be aware of  things,” said Wilbert Vincent, another local who likes being near the lake.

"We need to re-double our efforts for mosquito control,” said Dr. John England, M.D., Chair of Neurology at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine.

He is on to something new in terms of Zika complications in adults.

England, who is also Chair of the World Federation of Neurology’s Zika Task Force recently traveled to Honduras to investigate the outbreak of Zika there and he saw patients with acute complications from the Zika virus.

He spoke of a middle-aged man.

"As the virus was circulating in his blood he developed parathesia, tingling pain in his feet and his legs, over his abdomen and his chest in a patchy fashion,” said England.

It is a new confirmed neurological complication from the virus. England and his colleagues wrote the observation in the Journal of Neurological Science.

"What it teaches us is that the virus can not only cause problems in babies, but it can cause problems with adults that happen with the viral infection,” said England.

While it has not happened here, there are locally transmitted cases of Zika in Florida and with all of the rain in south Louisiana concerns grow here.
“And with people coming back with this infection there is the concern that mosquitoes will bite some of these infected people and then transmit the diseases to other people in the vicinity,” said England.

And in terms of standing water, England said it does not take a lot of water to aid in the breeding of mosquitoes.

"These mosquitoes like the Aedeas Agipdi which are the mosquitos that transmit Zika can lay eggs in bottle caps of water, just very, very small places of water where the eggs can be laid and then develop into mosquitos."

England added that the mosquito also bite during the day. He advises people spending time outdoors to wear repellant with Deet.

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