Study: Road rage impacts women more than men

Study: Road rage impacts women more than men

NEW ORLEANS, LA (WVUE) - Some people think instincts make women more likely to get angry while driving.

Hyundai researchers say they've discovered road rage impacts women more than men.

They put sensors on the hands of 1,000 drivers. They also put cameras inside cars to monitor them. They found women are 12 percent angrier than men while driving.

They think this is because of an instinctive "early warning system." Evolutionary researchers say the system dates back to our early female ancestors who relied on identifying threats to survive.