Travel warning issued in wake of 'attacks' in Cuba

CUBA TRAVEL WARNING

(WVUE) - "I don't know when this country is going to learn how to deal with the Cuban government," says Jose Antonio Nieto.

Nieto left Cuba when he was 22 years old and eventually became an American citizen. Nieto owns and operates a Cuban restaurant in Metairie.

"I told my sister over there that I'm not coming over any more," says Nieto.

He isn't at all surprised the U.S. is pulling families of diplomats out of Cuba after a string of mysterious sonic attacks.

"They don't want a relationship with the United States, ya know?" says Nieto.

"The notion that President Obama took Cuba out of the state terrorism list is ridiculous," says George Fowler.

U.S. Diplomats in Havana have suffered hearing loss and speech problems in a series of mysterious sonic attacks. The Cuban government has denied any involvement.

"They say we don't know what happened. Well, it is their responsibility to protect our diplomats, and we have over 50 Americans hurt in this acoustic attack," says Fowler.

George Fowler is general council of the Cuban American National Foundation. He believes the State Department did the right thing by issuing a travel warning urging all Americans not to travel to Cuba because they might be at risk.

"They have no respect for American citizens or their safety. These were our diplomats that they hurt. Imagine what they'd do to a regular American citizen," says Fowler.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson says the U.S. embassy in Havana will keep only emergency personnel working there until Cuba can ensure their safety. He says the U.S. will continue to have diplomatic relations with Cuba that advance U.S. interests and national security. The two countries say they'll continue to investigate. Fowler believes more action should be taken. Nieto agrees.

"I hope the agreement is stopped. The United States don't need to have any relationship with Cuba," says Nieto.

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