Real estate professionals excited for arrival of technology comp - FOX 8 WVUE New Orleans News, Weather, Sports, Social

Real estate professionals excited for arrival of technology company

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NEW ORLEANS, LA (WVUE) -

Real estate professionals look forward to seeing a ripple effect from a technology company's decision to move to New Orleans.

Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards announced Monday that DXC technology is coming to New Orleans, bringing more than 2,000 jobs.

Coldwell Banker Realtor Mary Margaret Kean said this is the economic development she's been waiting for.

"We are all very excited. I mean, the whole community's very excited," Kean said.

She said the housing market suffered when the movie industry slowed down in the city.

"We felt it pretty hard in the rental business, the lease business, as well as the homes - purchasing and selling. So we're very excited about bringing some of that back," Kean said.

She's also optimistic about what this means for the economy.

"We're very excited that the jobs that they're mentioning are higher paying jobs. They were talking about $70,000 salaries. That's fantastic," Kean said.

She added that there's room to grow on the West Bank, in New Orleans East and Central City. 

"I think there's going to be a great economical overall effect. I don't think this is going to drive the entire real estate up through the roof," Kean said.

She doesn't expect a dramatic spike in housing prices overnight.

"They're thinking of 300 jobs up until the next year. Three hundred jobs, 300 people, that's not going to affect us," Kean said.

However, some places in the city are already reaching sky-high prices. She said some homes in the Garden District sell upward of several million dollars.

"It'll cause some gentrification in certain areas, and generally the price of housing will go up, I believe. But, you know, with positive change there's not always positive results for every single person in the community," Garden District resident Luis Martinez said.

They both believe this growth is what the city needs.

"I think all of this coming, all these people coming, it helps elevate your standard and really, if you don't move and you don't grow, you die," Kean said.

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