Mississippi getting more than $19M to combat the opioid crisis

Mississippi getting more than $19M to combat the opioid crisis
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has a 5-Point Strategy to Combat the nation's Opioids Crisis. Those efforts include better addiction prevention, treatment, and recovery services; better data; better pain management; better targeting of overdose reversing drugs; and better research. (Source: KATV)

Washington, D.C. (WLOX) - Mississippi is getting more than $19 million over the next three years to combat the ever-growing opioid crisis in America. The money will help expand access to treatment and support near real-time data on the drug overdose crisis.

The money is part of $1.8 billion in overall funding announced Wednesday by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

“Our country is seeing the first drop in overdose deaths in more than two decades, more Americans are getting treatment for addiction, and lives are being saved,” HHS Secretary Alex Azar said. “At the same time, we are still far from declaring victory. We will continue executing on the Department’s 5-Point strategy for combating the opioid crisis, and laying the foundation for a healthcare system where every American can access the mental healthcare they need.”

This funding will help the Center for Disease Control and Prevention aid state and local governments in tracking overdose data as closely to real-time as possible and support them in work to prevent overdoses and save lives. States may report nonfatal data as quickly as every two weeks and report fatal data every six months.

Funding for the first year is being awarded to 47 states, Washington, D.C., 16 localities, and two territories.

In April of 2017, HHS announced a 5-Point Strategy to Combat the Opioids Crisis. Those efforts include better addiction prevention, treatment, and recovery services; better data; better pain management; better targeting of overdose reversing drugs; and better research.

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