The falling Mississippi River allows the Army Corps to close out its “flood fight”

Levee inspections had been ongoing for nearly six months

The falling Mississippi River allows the Army Corps to close out its “flood fight”
National Weather Service graphic depicting Mississippi River level in New Orleans of 9.9 ft at the Carrollton gauge (Source: NOAA)

NEW ORLEANS (WVUE) - After 176 days, the Mississippi River stage at the Carrollton gauge dropped below 11-feet, allowing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to suspend its flood fight efforts.

On Jan. 9, the Corps activated its phase I flood fight measures, which involve regular inspections of the levee system.

“The levee patrols associated with phase I help ensure the Corps and local levee authorities can respond quickly to problem areas (along the levee) because of elevated water levels,” according to a Corps statement.

The end of the “flood fight” also lifts certain limits on construction with 1,500 feet of the river levees. The Corps advises permit holders to contact local levee districts for more detail regarding their projects.

At mid-morning, the Carrollton gauge at the New Orleans District Headquarters of the Corps read 9.9 feet, roughly seven feet lower than the height earlier this year when the Corps operated the Bonnet Carre Spillway.

The National Weather Service forecasts the river to fall to 7-feet in coming weeks.

Copyright 2020 WVUE. All rights reserved.